ACMCU courses

Spring 2019

Click on a course below to view its description and other details.

For a summary of registration dates and deadlines, please visit the University Registrar's Important Dates page.

For more information about classes and the registration process here at Georgetown University, please visit the Registrar's Registration page.

*Please note: courses are only available to current Georgetown University students.

INAF 228: ISLAM AND TERRORISM 

Terrorism is not an Islamic phenomenon; the vast majority of Muslims condemn terrorism. But there is a great deal of terrorism committed in the name of Islam. The goal of this course is to understand what motivates both terrorists and mainstream Muslims, and the profound differences between them. We will examine the emergence of terrorist groups within their historical contexts, analyze their positions based on their own writings, and compare those positions with those of mainstream Muslims.

Main Campus: ICC #270   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTORTamara Sonn

INAF 403: Sex and Power in the islamic tradition

Whether involving the headscarf or kidnapped schoolgirls, discourse over Islam and Muslims is very often tied to questions of the treatment of women and women’s rights. It is thus also a discourse about power. In part, this is because any discussion of ‘Islam and women’ is politicized in the context of globalization and the tensions between perceptions of the globalization of Western norms on the one hand and perceptions of cultural authenticity on the other. In part, this inevitable political dimension exists because gender and sexuality in human society have always been categories and terms developed and wielded in the context of power, whether concerning the distribution of resources, rights to autonomy and movement, or power to define a community’s identity and history.

This course will explore the intersection of power and sexuality in the Islamic tradition, examining case studies in law, literature, society and politics from the early Islamic period to the present day.

Main Campus: ICC #270 
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan A.C. Brown

INAF 426: Muslims, Civil rights, & War on terror

Government agencies have broad powers to act for the public good, protect their borders, and safeguard their national interests. This includes the ability to investigate individuals and organizations, conduct surveillance about their activities, carry on diplomacy, and wage war abroad, capacities that have been strengthened by recent technological advances. The ability to perform these functions is in turn limited by various constitutional protections, human rights law, and humanitarian norms.

This course will explore how the U.S. government exercises these powers in discriminatory ways to marginalize, disenfranchise, and erase Muslims and Arabs both in the U.S. and abroad. This objective is often achieved through legal and policy machinations that while lawful undermine civil rights and liberties.

The course will walk students through this virulent history, placing special emphasis on how due process principles like the presumption of innocence, individualized suspicion and evidence of wrongdoing have been abandoned when it comes to Muslims and Arabs, and replaced with guilt by association, collective suspicion, and race and faith as proxies for crime. The course will also emphasize how Muslims struggle to express basic civil liberties, including free speech, worship, association, and privacy, and how the War on Terror is meant to police their everyday lives, just like Native and Black communities before them on through today. We will conclude by discussing the various ways in which Muslims and their allies are resisting both at home and abroad, and contextualize their demands amid other social and political movements, including Black Lives Matter and climate change activism. Our texts will include a variety of sources ranging from political and historical scholarship, case law, and government manuals to whistleblower documents, investigative journalism, TED Talks, and community advocacy reports. 

White Gravenor #409
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Arjun Sethi

INAF 473: Study of Islam & muslim-christian relations

The seminar will provide an overview of the study of the history of the encounter between Christians and Muslims over fourteen centuries, a history that has been marked by conflict and cooperation, diatribe and dialogue, hatred and tolerance, hostility and personal friendships. It will introduce the students to historical writings on particular periods perceived as having a special impact in shaping the current relationship between Muslims and the West such as the Crusades, Andalusia, European Imperialism, Orientalism, Christian missionary activities, women's liberation, and Muslim revolutionary movements. It will explore Muslim literature on Christianity and the growing Islamophobia.

Main Campus ICC# 270
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad

Arab 506: slavery and islam

Islam has been in the news. And slavery has been in the news. And 'Islam & slavery' has been in the news. These are some major understatements. When ISIS achieved prominence in 2014, Western audiences were stunned by the movement's revival of enslaving prisoners of war. Many, Muslims and non-Muslims alike, were shocked at ISIS' justification of slavery with reference to Islam's scriptures and laws. But the debate over Islam & slavery is much older, going back centuries.

It forms part of the global history of the phenomenon called slavery, a phenomenon that is as controversial at the level of academic study as it has been in its real-world manifestations. This course will examine efforts of philosophers and scholars to describe, justify or criticize a spectrum of phenomena we call slavery. It will place the Islamic tradition within this setting, charting the history, laws and practices of slavery in Islamic civilization, following it all the way up to debates over abolition and the efforts of some to revive and defend slavery today.

Main Campus ICC #217B   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan A.C. Brown

HIST 223: History of pakistan 

Though Pakistan’s heritage is ancient, it is one of the world’s youngest countries. Established by the partition of Pakistan in 1947, it is one of only two countries established as a homeland for a specific religious community. And it was established as a progressive democracy. But today it is characterized by conflict and deep conservatism.

This course examines the context for Pakistan’s establishment, the impact of global geopolitics on its development, and diverse responses to its contemporary challenges.

Main Campus ICC #107   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Tamara Sonn

hist 364: revolutionary thought in islam

The course will investigate the revolutionary message of the Qur'an and how it has been interpreted and utilized by a variety of Muslim revolutionaries throughout fourteen and a half centuries. It will cover the model of the Prophet Muhammad as a revolutionary, early Shi`ite and Abbasid revolutions, the jihads of West Africa and the Sudan as well as the modern Islamic movements: Muslim Brotherhood, the Iranian Revolution, Takfir wa Hijra, Islamic Salvation Front, Hamas, Hizbullah, Jihad Islami, Taliban, al-Qaeda and ISIS.

Main Campus ICC# 270
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad