ACMCU courses

Spring 2018

Click on a course below to view its description and other details.

For a summary of registration dates and deadlines, please visit the University Registrar's Important Dates page.

For more information about classes and the registration process here at Georgetown University, please visit the Registrar's Registration page.

HIST 223: History of Pakistan

Though Pakistan’s heritage is ancient, it is one of the world’s youngest countries. Established by the partition of Pakistan in 1947, it is one of only two countries established as a homeland for a specific religious community. And it was established as a progressive democracy. But today it is characterized by conflict and deep conservatism. This course examines the context for Pakistan’s establishment, the impact of global geopolitics on its development, and diverse responses to its contemporary challenges.

INSTRUCTOR: Tamara Sonn

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

HIST/INAF 569: Sayyid Qutb and Islamic Extremism

The seminar will examine the development of Islamic radicalism during the 20th century with special focus on the life and works of Sayyid Qutb in the context of Egyptian political, literary and religious history. It will provide an overview of the classical texts on jihad as well as well as the modern western sources that Qutb utilized in his redefinition of political Islam. It will also focus on the appeal of his ideology in the context of the encounter with the modern west as a colonial power and as a source of challenging ideas. We will look at texts from the Muslim Brotherhood, the Iranian Revolution, Takfir wa Hijra, Hamas, Hizbullah, Jihad Islami, and al-Qaeda.

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type
3 Credits 

INAF 228: Islam and Terrorism

Terrorism is not an Islamic phenomenon; the vast majority of Muslims condemn terrorism. But there is a great deal of terrorism committed in the name of Islam. The goal of this course is to understand what motivates both terrorists and mainstream Muslims, and the profound differences between them. We will examine the emergence of terrorist groups within their historical contexts, analyze their positions based on their own writings, and compare those positions with those of mainstream Muslims.

INSTRUCTOR: Tamara Sonn

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INAF 374: Intro to Muslim American Studies

Many Americans cherish an American dream “that all men are created equal”. But what is it like to be a Muslim in America? Since September 11, 2001, Muslim Americans have faced renewed challenges, with their loyalty to their country and their sense of belonging being questioned. With the emergence of the global jihadist movement and the radicalization of some American Muslims, and some one-sided media coverage and political rhetoric, Islam and Muslims in America have remained a misunderstood religion and people. This seminar course seeks to understand Islam, its origin and philosophy, and the spread of Islam in America from an historical perspective. It explores some concepts associated with Islam and Muslims in general. It also situates Muslim Americans in the broader local, national, and global context. It looks into the concept of identity and belonging of young American Muslims. It discusses diversity, differences among American Muslims, and relationships between Muslim Americans and the wider society. It also discusses national security issues and their impact on Muslim Americans. Finally, it discusses ways to build a cohesive American society.

INSTRUCTOR: Nahid Kabir

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

HIST 367/INAF 397: Muslim Women and the West

The seminar will provide an overview of the study of the history of the encounter between Christians and Muslims over fourteen centuries, a history that has been marked by conflict and cooperation, diatribe and dialogue, hatred and tolerance, hostility and personal friendships. It will introduce the students to historical writings on particular periods perceived as having a special impact in shaping the current relationship between Muslims and the West such as the Crusades, Andalusia, European Imperialism, Orientalism, Christian missionary activities, women's liberation, and Muslim revolutionary movements. It will explore Muslim literature on Christianity and the growing Islamophobia.

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INAF 418: Islam & Politics in Southeast Asia

This module examines Islam as it is experienced and disseminated through various forms of institutions, scholarly currents, movements, the media and sites across Southeast Asia. Students are exposed to the defining factors and forces that shape Muslim life in the region in the context of modernity, globalization and secularization. The major topics that will be examined include the roles of the ulama (religious scholars), the place of women in society, Muslim-non-muslim relations, Islamic popular culture and the nexus between traditionalism and reformism, among others. The module also seeks to deepen perspectives on Islam in Southeast Asia through the employment of theoretical tools such as those derived from anthropology, sociology of religion, religious studies and historical sociology.

INSTRUCTOR: Khairudin Aljunied

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INAF/THEO 411: The Quran & its Interpreters in the Modern World

This course will introduce students to the Qur’an (Koran), the holy scripture of Islam. We will examine its thematic development, literary style, and its relationship to pre-qur’anic, especially biblical traditions. Special attention is given to various methods Muslims have used to interpret the Qur’an, particularly in light of the challenges of modern science and moral norms.

INSTRUCTOR: Younus Mirza

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits

INAF/ARAB 417: Shariah & its Discontents

There are few topics as controversial globally and in the United States as poorly understood as ‘The Shariah’. This course will explore the actual nature and history of the Shariah tradition, with special focus on how it is understood and implemented today. It will also investigate the resonance of the Shariah amongst many Muslim populations.

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan A.C. Brown

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INAF/ARAB 406: Slavery & Islam

Islam has been in the news. And slavery has been in the news. And 'Islam & slavery' has been in the news. These are some major understatements. When ISIS achieved prominence in 2014, Western audiences were stunned by the movement's revival of enslaving prisoners of war. Many, Muslims and non-Muslims alike, were shocked at ISIS' justification of slavery with reference to Islam's scriptures and laws. But the debate over Islam & slavery is much older, going back centuries. It forms part of the global history of the phenomenon called slavery, a phenomenon that is as controversial at the level of academic study as it has been in its real-world manifestations. This course will examine efforts of philosophers and scholars to describe, justify or criticize a spectrum of phenomena we call slavery. It will place the Islamic tradition within this setting, charting the history, laws and practices of slavery in Islamic civilization, following it all the way up to debates over abolition and the efforts of some to revive and defend slavery today.

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan A.C. Brown

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits