ACMCU courses

Fall 2018

Click on a course below to view its description and other details.

For a summary of registration dates and deadlines, please visit the University Registrar's Important Dates page.

For more information about classes and the registration process here at Georgetown University, please visit the Registrar's Registration page.

*Please note: courses are only available to current Georgetown University students.

INAF 100-01: Proseminar: Terror in the Name of god

Understanding the relationship of religion to domestic and global violence & terrorism, for example ISIS and Al-Qaeda) remains critical in the 21st century. Religion has become an ideological alternative to the established order, a form of liberation, reform and resistance as well as guerrilla warfare, violence and terror in the name of God. This course will study the relationship of religion to violence and terrorism and the role of religion in conflict resolution using case studies from the U.S., the Middle East, Israel-Palestine, South Asia, Latin America, and Africa.
What is the role of religion (religious scriptures, beliefs, leaders and movements) in motivating and legitimating acts of violence and terrorism? How important are political, economic and social contexts and grievances in creating the conditions that have radicalized individuals and led to the formation of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu and Buddhist movements? Is religion or are political contexts the primary driver? How have the ideology/ theology and nature of religious militant groups evolved in the context of globalization and new technologies?
 

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR:
John L. Esposito

RESTRICTIONS:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges:

  • School of Foreign Service

Must be enrolled in one of the following Classifications:

  • First Year

INAF 100-14: Proseminar: Islam & the West

Academics, journalists and policymakers regularly refer to Islam, the West and the knotty question of Islam and the West.  Stepping outside of 'Islam' and 'the West', however, we see that neither is a concrete and unchanging reality.  Both exist as ideas conceived by particular communities, internally disputed and perceived by others.  This course will examine this conceptual knot through in-depth readings on how societies in the US (and Western Europe) understand ‘liberalism,’ ‘secularism,’ ‘Western values’ and ‘Islam/Muslims as threat’ within the context of debates over the nature of Islam, the West and their proper relationship.
 

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR:
Jonathan A.C. Brown

INAF 407: Islam, Democracy & Global Terrorism

Arab pro-democracy uprisings (the Arab Spring) that toppled autocratic regimes, the collapse of state authority challenges of governance, counter-revolutions and the role of militant extremist groups like Al Qaeda and ISIS raise questions about the future of political Islam and democracy. We will focus on the phenomenon of political Islam in the Middle East with some reference to Pakistan and Indonesia, examining the causes, implications, and consequences for the future of Islam in politics.

The course is divided into four parts: analysis of the Islamic order and the model(s) that inspire modern Islamist activists, the ideas of the main ideologues of contemporary Islamic movements; approaches to the understanding of contemporary political Islam and the Islamic movements; and case studies of movements in different contexts. It also probes the relationship between Islamism and the “Arab Spring” as well as global terrorism. Finally, the course will conclude with a critical analysis of the future of political Islam, democracy and global terrorism and US-Muslim world relations.

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: John L. Esposito

hist 109: Islamic world

From humble beginnings nearly 1500 years ago, to enormous power and prestige in the Middle Ages, to political decline and foreign occupation in the modern era, Islam has developed into a highly diverse, global tradition representing nearly one quarter of the world's population. Yet it is most widely known through caricatures of terrorists and despots. This course examines that phenomenon. It focuses on the historical development of Muslim communities and their interactions with European and other powers. It emphasizes the impact of those interactions on Islam’s ideological and political developments. The interaction between religion and politics is a major sub-theme of the course.

Main Campus   
Lecture Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Tamara Sonn

HIST 363: Muslims in the west

The seminar will examine the formation and growth of the Muslim communities in North America and Europe with specific focus on France, Germany, UK and the US, It will provide a history of the formation of the various Muslim communities in the west; explore the dynamics of community and identity development of the immigrants in a western context and various government integration policies (multiculturalism, laicite and assimilation); the development of western depictions of Muslims as labor migrants, ethnic enclaves to Muslims and increasingly as terrorists. It will also explore the creation of an Islamic minority perspective particularly among the alienated youth as a response to Islamophobia, and the various Muslim effort to create an authentic Muslim western identity through literature, music, fashion, and art.

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad

hist 463: Vanishing Christians of the middle east

The seminar will examine the transformation of the Eastern churches into Arab-Christians in modern history, their participation in the formation of the nation state, their current decline and the renewed call for their protection. It will provide a brief survey of the early developments of Christian controversies, the encounter with Islam, with European hegemony and Pax Americana post WWII. It will examine the prospects for the survival of Christianity in the Arab world in light of rise of Islamic fundamentalism and Christian emigration to the West. It will introduce students to historical writings on particular periods. The course emphasizes discussion and engagement with assigned readings. Students are expected to engage in original research and articulate conclusions both orally and in writing.

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Yvonne Haddad

hist 468: Islamic Modernism

Virtually all modern Muslim thinkers focus on reform of Islamic societies, recovery from colonialism, and facing the challenges of post-colonial development. Some approaches to these issues are hostile to modernity, stressing the importance of returning to traditional norms, for example, or developing innovative but highly conservative social coping mechanisms. This course focuses on a diverse range of efforts by Muslim thinkers over the past 150 years who actually engage with modernity and try to articulate Islam’s place in it.

Main Campus   
Seminar Schedule Type 
3 Credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Tamara Sonn